How To Achieve This Guitar Tone?

Can you share some basic knowledge in effects/pedals/chain? :slight_smile:

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I don’t have much knowledge to share that you don’t already have… Your tone AND your technique are perfect ! You sound great !
:ok_hand: :+1:

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I guess the video is for tone reference.
There is not a lot of processing involved here, a high gain amp and a some delay and reverb should get you close. He is known for playing Mezzabarba amps, high gain italian boutique amps but any good high gain amp or pedal dynamic enough to clean up well when rolling the guitar volume down would get you there.
The trickier part is to match Marco Sfogli’s touch and technique, that guy is a monster.
During the whole tune he is playing with one setting and a modulates between almost clean to big solo lea drive by switching the pickups, single coil neck for clean and bridge humbucker for drive, rolling down volume for cleans, and also by adjusting is technique in a beatifull, masterfull way.
It’s all about dynamics as Kiko would probably say :sweat_smile:

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For the soft parts, the rhythm tone is definitely a chorus pedal with the neck pickup (either a single coil or humbucker would work for that kind of sound, but I think 99.9% of people would prefer the single coil, and that’s likely what he used).

The lead sound in the soft sections is definitely an “edge of breakup” Stevie Ray Vaughan kind of sound. He is using a single coil neck pickup for sure, very stratty sound. There is also reverb and delay on the leads. SRV used fender amps with two Ibanez tube screamers set with the volume know all the way up and the gain all the way down, just pushing the amp harder without really distorting it more. One of them was always on, one of them he used as a solo boost. This kind of sound let’s you do very dynamic stuff (like @brunobatista was saying) where if you turn the volume down and/or pick lightly, you get a clean sound, but if you turn the volume know up and/or pick more aggressively, you get a bitting, distorted sound.

For the high gain parts, it’s clearly a metal sound. The lead also has delay and reverb. Both the rhythm part and the lead part are using a bridge humbucker.

Switching between these sounds is really impressive, generally amps that are good at high gain aren’t that good for those edge of breakup sounds, but then again, it might just depend on the amp and the guitar/pickups. I know I’ve had hit or miss experiences doing the opposite, pushing a fender tweed into metal territory with an overdrive. Once it sounded like absolute garbage, and once (with a 2x12 instead of a 1x12) it was alright, a little underwhelming, but it was the kind of thing that I know that was the only one who cared about it, the sound did the job. I was pushing the amps to their absolute limits in both scenarios though, and I was barely getting enough gain (and I’m not a huge gain fiend, I like as little distortion as possible without sounding weak for rhythm sounds, it adds clarity to chords and makes everything tighter/less muddy. For solos I like to boost amps to get more sustain and volume of course).

Sorry if you wanted something much simpler than this, I love to geek out about gear almost as much as I love playing music.

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